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Partners Summit at Pacifica Graduate Institute

Keynote speaker and honorable first district supervisor Salud Carbajal discussed the quality of our food distribution system, what it means when you eat “bad” food, and more at the Partner’s Summit at the Pacifica Graduate Institute on September 24th.

Highlights from Salud Carbajal’s speech:
“Simply put, bad food is bad for our health, bad for our environment, and  bad for our economy.”

“The question is- if we don’t find a way to improve coordination between the public, nonprofit and private sectors to change the quality of our food distribution system, what will the cost be in our future- in both lives lost and economic impacts?”

“On October 24, the 4th annual Family Day & Health Fair we will join Santa Barbara Open Streets Calles Vivas for the first time- bringing the Health Fair to this huge festival which promotes healthy living and activity by transforming Cabrillo Bvld. into a car free zone full of walking, rolling, dancing, skateboarding and many more healthy activities. We will focus on promoting access to medical care and having a medical home, and friendly, bilingual and culturally relevant education on why healthy eating and having an active, healthy family lifestyle is an important (and fun) form of preventative health care. When all families and individuals in our community are healthy, the community as a whole is a stronger and healthier place to live!”

“I believe, as the data shows, having a healthy food system is not just a public policy issue, it is a moral issue.  The most disadvantaged in our community are disproportionately affected by the current system since they have limited resources, opportunities and choices for healthy alternatives.”

Erik Talkin, the Foodbank’s CEO also presented, as well as Erin Hansen, Foodbank’s Community Nutrition Coordinator. All sessions at the event discussed nutrition education, advocacy, fundraising, data analysis, CalFresh, and more.

We are thrilled that so many of our partners collaborated and enjoyed the event! If we work together, we can reach our goal of ending hunger in Santa Barbara County.

Summit1 Summit2 Summit3 Summit4 Summit5 Summit6

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What is Plant Based Eating? And Why Should I Care?

The environment and its health is a hot topic right now.  Similarly, OUR health is a hot topic right now.  Many of us have seen the warnings…

Global Impact Infographic

Ecological Footprints Tim De Chant, Per Square Mile

1. If the whole world lived like we do in the United States, we would need 4.1 earths.1

2. More than one-third (34.9% or 78.6 million) of U.S. adults are obese.2

3. This generation of children may be the first in U.S. history to live sicker and die younger than their parents.Heart Disease and Diabetes

4. 1 in 4 Americans will die from heart disease.4

5. 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, have diabetes.5

According to journalist and blogger Tim De Chant, the USA makes up 5% of the global population, but we use 20% of the world’s energy. We eat 15% of the world’s meat (that’s 10 BILLION Animals Every Year), and we produce 40% of the world’s garbage, which includes 16 BILLION disposable diapers every year.  In addition, each American throws away 1200 pounds of organic garbage every year that can be composted. We consume an awful lot of STUFF and hardly take a minute to think about its effects.

I want to zero in on those 10 Billion animals we kill and eat every year.  What are the implications for our environment and our health?  Many researchers will argue that it is this animal consumption that is responsible for our obesity, our lower life expectancy, our sick hearts, our out-of-control blood sugar, and our very sick planet.

And OH BOY there are a lot of implications! Over the next several posts, we will dive into all the dangers our planet and we face if we don’t change our attitudes about and consumption of animals. Let’s start with:

Our Health

As stated, many will agree that the overconsumption of animals is directly related to the health crisis Americans find themselves in today.  (Sugar plays a big role in this too.)  According to renowned Food Writer, Author and New York Times Columnist Mark Bittman who follows a “Vegan Before 6pm” lifestyle:

  • Americans are consuming close to 200 pounds of meat, fish, and poultry per year, an increase in 50 pounds in the last 50 years.6
  • Each average animal eater takes in about 110 grams of protein every day, which is double the recommended daily allowance. About 75 grams of these come from animal foods.6
  • According to the Institute of Medicine we only need approximately 10 to 15 percent of our calories to come from protein. The average woman needs about 46 grams per day and the average man, 56 grams per day.7
  • Many current nutrition experts would argue that 55 grams of protein (half of the average 110 grams) a day is more than we need, and roughly 30 grams, strictly from plant sources, is perfectly adequate.6

These staggering numbers showcase how overindulgent we are with protein. High protein, low carbohydrate diets are all the rage; Paleo, Atkins, even the new Whole 30. They are encouraging us to consume an alarming amount of animal protein that is directly contributing to our epidemic rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Dr_-Richard-O-Dr. Richard Oppenlander, a sustainability consultant, researcher, and author who has spent 40 years studying the effects food choices have on our planet and on us wrote about the HUGE cost animal consumption is to our health and healthcare system in his new book “Food Choice and SustainabilityWhy Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work.The BEET FOod CHoice and SustainabilityRecently featured on Julianne Heaver, Plant Based Dietitian’s blog, a nationally recognized advocate and expert on plant based nutrition, she provided a quote from his new groundbreaking book: I quote:8

“In the U.S. and other developed countries, eating animals is one of the most significant risk factors found in nearly all of the most common diseases. It is, therefore, heavily implicated in rising health care costs, health insurance premiums, foods prices, and even labor costs for businesses. Those who eat animals are driving up all these costs while driving down productivity.

More than $3 trillion dollars were spent on health care in 2012 ($2.83 trillion in 2009, growing at 6 percent per year) in the U.S. Of that, minimally $130 billion dollars spent were due to dietary choices related to livestock. I believe this figure is quite conservative and could be as high as $350 billion due to eating animals, because this is how some of the $3 trillion was spent:

  • $300 billion—heart disease
  • $200 billion—diabetes
  • $190 billion—obesity
  • $124 billion—cancer
  • $88 billion—food-borne illness

These figures are truly staggering and are for just one single year. They also do not reflect loss of productivity. For obesity alone, it is estimated that the annual cost of the workdays missed is $30 billion, with employers losing, on average, $3,800 per year for a single obese person. These are not just figures or statistics to me; they’re patterns that tell a story about what we choose to eat as a society and what happens to us afterwards—the stark and very real consequences. Eating animal products increases risks of contracting diseases that contribute to all of these health care costs. Eating plants, on the other hand, will take you in the other direction, protecting you from developing these diseases.”

According to Dr. Oppenlander, it is estimated that eating purely plant-based foods provides the following protective benefits, as compared to individuals eating the average amount of meat:

  • 50 percent less risk of coronary heart disease (CHD)
  • 40 percent less risk of cancer (breast, colon, prostate, ovarian, 
pancreatic, lung)
  • 70 percent less likelihood of adult onset diabetes
  • 50 percent less likelihood of developing hypertension

Most people are unaware any foods other than animal foods have protein! Seriously! This cartoon below is actually a pretty accurate portrayal of most Americans.

photo

This is far from true! As a plant based eater myself, I can’t tell you how many people have asked me in a panic “BUT WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR PROTEIN?” Here’s the meme I want to show them:

mostinterestingman

You CAN find plenty of protein in plants! And Veggie protein has so many more positive benefits! Here are just some of the plant-based protein superstars and the amount of protein they contain per cup: (featured on Plantbaseddietitian.com)9

vegan

For now, on this complex and complicated topic, I leave you to think about your health, what you eat, and how much you spend annually on healthcare costs. Do you think you have room for improvement? Does this post make you think twice about having your typical eggs and bacon breakfast? How about a deliciously deceiving Tofu Breakfast Scramble with a side of sweet Good Morning Quinoa Breakfast Cereal!   Both are protein packed, will send you off to work/school/or wherever with the sustained energy to make a difference and advocate for a more kind and healthy food culture! YEA!!The BEET-I am Not a Hamburger

Stay tuned in the next few months for how consuming animal foods is extremely detrimental to our planet and to the welfare of animals. And trust me, there is light at the end of the tunnel. People are doing amazing things to turn the health of our planet around. In addition, many leading experts in plant based nutrition are fervently spreading the word about the harmful effects of too much animal protein, so hopefully we as a nation can turn our health around too!

References:

  1. PopSci
  2. CDC
  3. State of Obesity
  4. CDC
  5. Diabetes.org
  6. Mark Bittman, New York Times
  7. IOM
  8. Julianne Heaver
  9. Julianne Heaver 

Community Programs Coordinator 

Organization: Foodbank of Santa Barbara County
Position Title: Community Programs Coordinator
Reports to: Director of Community Impact
Location: Santa Barbara Warehouse (4554 Hollister Ave, Santa Barbara) or Santa Maria Warehouse (490 W Foster Road, Santa Maria)

Objective of Job:
The Community Programs Coordinator oversees key community programs, and assists in the oversight and evaluation of all programs as we meet the Foodbank’s mission to end hunger and transform the health of Santa Barbara County through good nutrition. The Community Programs Coordinator will be part of an innovative, energized team within an organization that is constantly moving forward toward its mission.

Duties and Responsibilities:

·         Oversee program development and expansion, volunteer training and management, support with grants, and all logistics and day-to-day operations of several Foodbank programs.
·         Assist in the on-going evaluation and monitoring of Foodbank programs.
·         Facilitate the adoption of programs by partner organizations and adapt programs to address the needs of target client populations.
·         Develop relationships and communicate with external partners. Communicate internally with all Foodbank departments as needed, including Operations, Development, Impact, Finance and Executive.
·         Oversee 1-2 programs interns who may assist in coordinating key community programs.
·         Support Impact Department to reach goals related to budget, reports, grants, evaluations, events, partnerships, Board of Trustees, etc.
·         Other duties as assigned or delegated.

IV. EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE

·         Bachelor’s degree in related field (Social Science, Education, or Nutritional Science preferred)
·         Experience and knowledge of Nutrition or Advocacy/Community Organizing
·         Project management experience preferred
·         Knowledge of federal nutrition programs preferred
·         Experience with grants preferred

V. SKILLS AND ABILITIES

·         Comfortable working in a fast-paced, dynamic environment
·         Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail and accuracy. Includes time management skills
·         Strong communication skills, including written, verbal, and presentation skills. Able to communicate effectively with staff, management and executives.
·         Able to work effectively, both independently and as part of a team
·         Proven ability to build effective working relationships and strong interpersonal skills
·         Strong analytic and problem-solving skills
·         Ability to hold self and others accountable to deadlines
·         Demonstrated commitment to supporting low-income and underserved populations
·         Proficient in Microsoft Office Professional Suite, including Power Point, Excel, Access, Outlook, Word etc. Experience with Google Drive, and project management software, such as Basecamp or Asana
·         Familiarity with databases, such as Ceres and/or Salesforce
·         Proficient reading, writing, and speaking in Spanish, including the ability to give public presentations in Spanish. (Preferred)
·         Experience managing volunteers and coordinating events and programs
·         Commitment to ending hunger through good nutrition

V. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

·         Valid CA Driver’s License
·         Clear driving record
·         Access to reliable transportation for occasional work-related travel
·         Ability to lift 30 pounds

The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County embraces a philosophy that recognizes and values diversity. Our goal is to attract, develop, retain and promote a talented diverse workforce in a culture where all employees will contribute to their fullest potential,

To apply for this position, please email your cover letter and resume. The priority consideration deadline for this position is October 12, 2015. Materials received after this date will be considered on a rolling basis.

Please visit our website for more information about our programs and organization at www.foodbanksbc.org

March 30 – Lompoc Empty Bowls Serves Hundreds to Help Feed Hungry

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Soups of all kinds were served — and promptly gobbled up — Wednesday in Lompoc at a key fundraiser for the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County.

Judith Monte, Foodbank development manager, estimated late Wednesday afternoon that the 11th annual Lompoc Empty Bowls event served between 400 and 450 people in addition to volunteers, putting it on par with past events.

This marked the second year the event occurred at the Dick DeWees Community & Senior Center.

“It was a great event,” she said. “The extra space we had made the flow of the event very, very nice.”

For a donation of $25, attendees picked out an artistic bowl and got to eat soup made by more than a dozen local restaurants and chefs, with community volunteers ladling the tasty concoctions.

“This is the best right here,” Angel Ramos said of the pot of split pea soup sitting before him.

His sales pitch didn’t win one customer within ear shot.

One of hundreds of bowls made for the Empty Bowls fundraiser says it all. (Janene Scully / Noozhawk photo)

“I would be on my death bed before I had pea soup,” a woman said with a smile before veering to another server with a different soup.

Bowl makers included Allan Hancock College ceramic students, Lompoc High School art students, Lompoc Valley Middle School art students, plus members of Orcutt Academy High School, Vandenberg Village Lions Club and Pier Fitness.

Alice Laufer demonstrated the craft of pottery at the back of the room. For approximately a decade, her Lompoc Valley Middle School students have made bowls for the event.

“I think community service is really good for them,” she said. “It’s kind of surprising for them to realize they can make a difference in their world.”

The Foodbank has committed to boost the quantity of food going to Lompoc because it’s the area with the greatest need, she said.

“This will help us to be able to financially do that,” she added.

Alice Laufer, a teacher at Lompoc Valley Middle School, demonstrates the art of pottery. (Janene Scully / Noozhawk photo)

The event is a testimony to the spirit of the Lompoc Valley, Monte added.

“Empty Bowls is just a great demonstration of that community spirit,” Monte said.

While Lompoc Empty Bowls is held each spring, Santa Maria’s occurs in the fall, with this year’s planned for Oct. 28.

The Santa Barbara Empty Bowls event is scheduled for a Sunday in early November.

http://www.noozhawk.com/article/lompoc_empty_bowls_serves

Meet Amy, The Pear Princess

Santa Barbara’s youngest foodies “FLIP” for good nutrition in Foodbank’s
Food Literacy in Preschool Program at Storyteller Children’s Center

AmyFour-year-old Amy is a self proclaimed fan of pears. She loves learning about fruits and vegetables, and especially enjoys participating in fun activities like making recipes with her family using fresh produce from Foodbank’s Food Literacy in Preschool (FLIP) program. FLIP serves a dual purpose: delivering short-term food assistance and providing nutrition education.

Amy is one of the 24 preschoolers (plus 20 toddlers) who attend Storyteller Children’s Center, a childcare center for homeless and at-risk children from 18 months to 5 years of age.

Every month, she looks forward to Foodbank’s FLIP program held at Storyteller.

“I liked making apple juice and apple spirals last time and today’s pear smoothie is yummy,” said Amy.

On a recent Thursday, as crisp fall fruits come into season, the kids at Storyteller received a hands-on lesson in crafting a healthy pear snack.

Gathered around a munchkin-sized table, the kids eagerly descended on the bounty of fresh, local Comice pears – sourced and delivered by Foodbank.

The boisterous class grew quiet in concentration as Amy and her classmates, with help from Storyteller teacher Maria Lopez and Foodbank’s Community Nutrition Program Coordinator Erin reading to kids[3]Erin Hansen, began earnestly slicing the fruit using kid-friendly tools. The hubbub swelled again as the dozen Lilliputian chefs continued mixing and blending the ingredients – pears, bananas, orange juice, vanilla yogurt and ice cubes – to complete today’s recipe, joyfully dubbed “Pear-adise Smoothies.”

“It’s so important for us to empower kids to make nutritious choices and learn about the diversity of nutritious foods from a young age,” said Erin Hansen. “Incorporating healthy foods into their lives early, increases their ability to become healthy adults.”

This is one of the few times during the month Amy gets this type of exposure to fresh fruits and vegetables. Amy is one of nearly 50,000 local children who are provided with nutritious food and education through Foodbank direct programs or Foodbank’s 330+ nonprofit partners like Storyteller. Many families in Amy’s situation wish they could eat more fruits and vegetables, but might not initially buy them on their own because of the expense. And 71% of families served by the Foodbank must make heartbreaking choices of buying food or paying for housing, utilities, transportation, clothing and other basic necessities.

After each month’s FLIP lesson the children get to take home a bag of the featured produce to their families. FLIP is the first step in Foodbank’s “Feed the Future” continuum of programs, and helps drive one of the Foodbank’s key strategies: to reach families in our communities through their children. Kids bring their new-found knowledge – and in the case of FLIP, the fresh produce – back to their families, inspiring families to come together to try out new recipes and eat more nutritiously.

“We see that our kids are a tremendous influence on their families, said Rob Grayson Development Director for Storyteller. “This is especially so when they are excited about a fun new recipe they’ve learned and want to show their parents and siblings how to make it. The whole family gets to incorporate a healthy new meal or snack into their regular diet.”

FLIP is currently offered at six school-based, preschool and early childcare centers throughout Santa Barbara County.

“It’s a great partnership working with Foodbank,” said Grayson. “For our kids, the meals they get here are often times the most well-rounded and nutritious meals they get in a day, and FLIP also creates this opportunity to stretch this vital health resource into a lifetime of healthy choices.”

“Storyteller is committed to transforming the lives of some of our most vulnerable families by providing children the earliest start to break through generational cycles of poverty,” said Erik Talkin, CEO of Foodbank. “It is an honor to work side by side as we, too, provide tools to help families break through cycles of poor nutrition to create a healthy future for all.”

Locally, Foodbank of Santa Barbara County serves 144,000 low-income, below federal poverty level individuals in Santa Barbara County (one if four of our total population), many of them working families, children and seniors. For more information about FLIP and other Foodbank programs, visit www.foodbanksbc.org.

FOODBANK THANKSGIVING DRIVE

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http://sbseasons.com/blog/foodbankthanksgiving/

FOODBANK THANKSGIVING DRIVE
POSTED ON NOV 19

Unknown-5 Help Foodbank give back during the holiday season for its annual Thanksgiving Drive taking place from November 15-26.

With the goal of raising $160,000 and collecting 4,500 turkeys, your donation will help families in need enjoy a warm Thanksgiving meal with loved ones. Wells Fargo will be sponsoring the Thanksgiving Drive with a $15,000 one to one challenge grant.

How to contribute:

  • Healthy and nutritious food drop-offs can be made at the Santa Barbara Foodbank facility located on 4554 Hollister Avenue, from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on weekdays with extended hours beginning November 18 to 5:30 p.m.
  • Though Foodbank is only open on weekdays, they will open their facilities on Saturday, November 15 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. during Saturday Family Day to allow those who can’t stop by during regular weekday hours make a donation.
  • On Saturday, November 22 The Letter Carriers Food Drive will collect non-perishable food donations left by mailboxes and in post offices and deliver the donations to Foodbank.
  • Local Girl Scout Troops will be participating in the drive throughout the community.

To see updates on the Foodbank’s Thanksgiving Drive campaign or for more information, visit http://www.foodbanksbc.org/thanksgiving-drive/.

For more information or to volunteer during the Thanksgiving Drive or holiday season, please visit Foodbank at foodbanksbc.orgor call 805/967-5741.

–Breanne Lewis

CSF Students at Santa Maria High Collecting Canned Goods for Foodbank

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/csf_students_at_santa_maria_high_collecting_canned_goods_for_foodbank

CSF Students at Santa Maria High Collecting Canned Goods for Foodbank

Honors students of the California Scholarship Federation at Santa Maria High School soon will complete a three-week Canned Food Drive to benefit the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. (Santa Maria Joint Union High School District photo)

 By Kenny Klein for the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District | Published on 11.18.2014

 Cans of food that offer hope are being collected to help the less fortunate during the holidays.

Honors students of the California Scholarship Federation at Santa Maria High Schoolwill complete their three-week “Canned Food Drive” on Friday.

The CSF students, who usually collect 700 to 1,000 pounds of food, plan it as a gift to the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County on Foster Road.

The canned goods have been collected from about 35 classrooms and administrative offices on campus.

CSF President Lauren Hunt believes helping others is an important civic duty.

“As a school, we all wish to help our community and encourage others to give back to their community and neighbors,” Hunt said. “We hope to donate an ample supply of food goods to the community to ensure good holidays for everyone in Santa Maria. We understand the struggles of our community, and this is one avenue through which we can give back to the community that supports us as a school.”

English language development teacher and CSF adviser Suzanne Rocco said students really understand what “giving back” means.

“With the help of students, staff and the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County, SMHS’ CSF members will help make the upcoming holiday season a little brighter,” Rocco said.

In the past, the students have donated the canned food to nonprofit organizations, including Catholic Charities, Good Samaritan, the Woman’s Shelter and SMHS families.

— Kenny Klein is a public information officer for the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District.

 

Local Girl Scouts Holding Holiday Food Drive to Benefit Foodbank

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http://www.noozhawk.com/article/local_girl_scouts_holding_holiday_food_drive_to_benefit_foodbank

Local Girl Scouts Holding Holiday Food Drive to Benefit Foodbank

By Girl Scouts-Costa de Oro Service Unit | Published on 11.18.2014

 The local Girl Scout service unit will be holding a holiday food drive this month.

On the weekend before Thanksgiving, Girl Scouts from Goleta to Carpinteria will be at neighborhood Vons supermarkets accepting donations on behalf of the Foodbank of Santa Barbara.

Mother-daughter food drive organizers Michelle and Clare Kelly said the goal of the drive is to collect more than 3,000 pounds of food to help make the holiday season bright for local families in need this year.

“I’ve done a food drive with my Girl Scout troop the past eight years,” Senior Girl Scout Clare Kelly said. “It was so much fun that I thought other troops in our service unit might like to participate and help even more people in need. Last year, the whole service unit participated in the holiday food drive and it was a huge success.”

In 2013, 130 Girl Scouts and leaders from 18 troops collected 3,257 pounds of food in 20 hours.

“The goal of last year’s food drive was a ton — 2,000 pounds,” troop leader Michelle Kelly said. “Since we collected 3,200 pounds last year, the girls set a goal of 3,300 pounds for this year.”

On Friday, Nov. 21, six troops will be collecting donations at the Montecito Vons, the Vons on Fairview Avenue in Goleta and the Vons in Santa Barbara’s La Cumbre Plaza. On Saturday, Nov. 22, 16 troops will be collecting donations at the La Cumbre Plaza Vons, the Vons on Fairview Avenue, the Carpinteria Vons and the Vons on Turnpike Road in Goleta.

The programs receiving assistance from the Foodbank include food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, after-school and senior feeding programs. Items needed include olive oil, fresh produce, peanut butter, canned or dried fruit, canned vegetables, canned stew and vegetarian chili, cornmeal, tortillas, canned meats, fruit juice, pasta, rice, beans, tuna, soup, bread, cereal, spices, coffee and tea.

For those unable to make it to one of the five Vons locations, donations can always be dropped off during regular weekday Foodbank hours (7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.) at 4554 Hollister Ave. in Goleta. The Foodbank will also accept checks. For every dollar donated, the Foodbank can provide eight healthy meals for people.

For more information about the food drive, contact the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County at 805.967.5741.

The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County is transforming health by eliminating hunger and food insecurity through good nutrition and food literacy. The Foodbank provides nourishment and education through its award-winning programs and a network of more than 330 member nonprofit partners. In Santa Barbara County, one in four people receive food support from the Foodbank; more than 140,575 unduplicated people of whom 36 percent are children. Last year, the Foodbank distributed 9.3 million pounds of food – half of which was fresh produce. Click here for more information.

The Costa de Oro Service Unit serves all Girl Scout troops from Carpinteria to Goleta, providing support to more than 65 troops, approximately 700 girls and more than 300 adults. Costa de Oro is one of the largest service units in the Central Coast Council, which serves the six counties of Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura. Click here for more information.

CSF Students at Santa Maria High Collecting Canned Goods for Foodbank

 

 

 

 

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Honors students of the California Scholarship Federation at Santa Maria High School soon will complete a three-week Canned Food Drive to benefit the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. (Santa Maria Joint Union High School District photo)

 By Kenny Klein for the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District | Published on 11.18.2014 5:02 p.m.

Cans of food that offer hope are being collected to help the less fortunate during the holidays.

Honors students of the California Scholarship Federation at Santa Maria High School will complete their three-week “Canned Food Drive” on Friday. The CSF students, who usually collect 700 to 1,000 pounds of food, plan it as a gift to the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County on Foster Road. The canned goods have been collected from about 35 classrooms and administrative offices on campus. CSF President Lauren Hunt believes helping others is an important civic duty. “As a school, we all wish to help our community and encourage others to give back to their community and neighbors,” Hunt said. “We hope to donate an ample supply of food goods to the community to ensure good holidays for everyone in Santa Maria. We understand the struggles of our community, and this is one avenue through which we can give back to the community that supports us as a school.” English language development teacher and CSF adviser Suzanne Rocco said students really understand what “giving back” means.“ With the help of students, staff and the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County, SMHS’ CSF members will help make the upcoming holiday season a little brighter,” Rocco said. In the past, the students have donated the canned food to nonprofit organizations, including Catholic Charities, Good Samaritan, the Woman’s Shelter and SMHS families.

— Kenny Klein is a public information officer for the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District.

 http://santabarbarariviera.com/schools/csf-students-at-santa-maria-high-collecting-canned-goods-for-foodbank/